Vertex dividing head manual pdf

Hair loss vertex dividing head manual pdf a man. Typically at least the head is involved.

The severity of hair loss can vary from a small area to the entire body. Diagnosis of hair loss is partly based on the areas affected. Treatment of pattern hair loss may simply involve accepting the condition. Hair loss is a common problem. Pattern hair loss by age 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females. Baldness is the partial or complete lack of hair growth, and part of the wider topic of “hair thinning”.

Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and either thins out or falls out. People have between 100,000 and 150,000 hairs on their head. The number of strands normally lost in a day varies, but on average is 100. In order to maintain a normal volume, hair must be replaced at the same rate at which it is lost. The first signs of hair thinning that people will often notice are more hairs than usual left in the hairbrush after brushing or in the basin after shampooing. Styling can also reveal areas of thinning, such as a wider parting or a thinning crown.

A substantially blemished face, back and limbs could point to cystic acne. Both can cause hair thinning. Hair thinning and baldness cause psychological stress due to their effect on appearance. Although societal interest in appearance has a long history, this particular branch of psychology came into its own during the 1960s and has gained momentum as messages associating physical attractiveness with success and happiness grow more prevalent.

Hair is considered an essential part of overall identity: especially for women, for whom it often represents femininity and attractiveness. Men typically associate a full head of hair with youth and vigor. Although they may be aware of pattern baldness in their family, many are uncomfortable talking about the issue. Hair thinning is therefore a sensitive issue for both sexes. For sufferers, it can represent a loss of control and feelings of isolation. Psychological problems due to baldness, if present, are typically most severe at the onset of symptoms.

Body image does not return to the previous state after regrowth of hair for a majority of patients. Family therapy can help families to cope with these psychological problems if they arise. The cause in female pattern hair remains unclear. This causes individual strands to become weak and break off, reducing overall hair volume. Onset of this disorder tends to begin around the onset of puberty and usually continues through adulthood. Due to the constant extraction of the hair roots, permanent hair loss can occur.

Radiation to the scalp, as when radiotherapy is applied to the head for the treatment of certain cancers there, can cause baldness of the irradiated areas. In this situation, the hair is actually thicker during pregnancy due to increased circulating oestrogens. Although thought to be caused by hair follicles becoming dormant, what triggers alopecia areata is not known. It is a triangular, or oval in some cases, shaped patch of hair loss in the temple area of the scalp that occurs mostly in young children. The affected area mainly contains vellus hair follicles or no hair follicles at all, but it does not expand. Its causes are unknown, and although it is a permanent condition, it does not have any other effect on the affected individuals.

Gradual thinning of hair with age is a natural condition known as involutional alopecia. Because they are not usually associated with an increased loss rate, male-pattern and female-pattern hair loss do not generally require testing. If hair loss occurs in a young man with no family history, drug use could be the cause. The number of extracted hairs is counted and examined under a microscope. Normally, fewer than three hairs per area should come out with each pull.

If more than ten hairs are obtained, the pull test is considered positive. The root of the plucked hair is examined under a microscope to determine the phase of growth, and is used to diagnose a defect of telogen, anagen, or systemic disease. Telogen hairs have tiny bulbs without sheaths at their roots. Telogen effluvium shows an increased percentage of hairs upon examination. Anagen hairs have sheaths attached to their roots. Anagen effluvium shows a decrease in telogen-phase hairs and an increased number of broken hairs.